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Chiang Mai Attractions

All Temples in Chiang Mai

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Doi Suthep is a constant part of life in Chiang Mai. A Thai saying goes, "If you haven't tasted Khao Soi or seen the view from Doi Suthep, you haven't been to Chiang Mai." This regal mountain overlooks the city from the northwest, providing commanding views from its summit. Aside from its dominating presence on the horizon, Doi Suthep is the home of some of the most deeply loved symbols in the Kingdom.

In 1981 Doi Suthep, Doi Pui and Doi Buakha, along with the 161 square kilometres (62 square miles) of forest in which they are located, became Thailand's 24th national park. A year later a 100 square kilometre Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00 - 18:00
  • Location: Th Huay Kaew, Doi Suthep
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Founded by King Muang Kaew in 1497,the Viharn is Lanna Style and was previously the Royal Hall of Chao Kawilorot. The second floor is heavily adorned and features two large seated Buddha images. The white image is solid teak and was carved after a vision by King Naresuan in the late 16th century, when he defeated the Burmese forces near Muang Ngai. This vision is depicted in the carved wood panels on the east wall. Having been massively restored in the mid 90’s this a definatley a temple to head to if you are interested in contemporary religious art. Wat Chetawan and Wat Mahawan are also on the same road. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00-19:00
  • Location: Thapae Road
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Wat Chang Kong

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Wat Chang Kong is located on Loi Kroh Road. It was constructed by Chang Kong villagers who immigrated from Chiang Sean at the beginning of the Rama Period it now stands as an abandoned chedi which is completely surrounded by shops and dwellings on three sides.

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Wat Chedi Luang's massive chedi (pagoda) was built sometime between 1385 and 1402, during the reign of King Saen Muang Ma, 7th ruler of the Mengrai dynasty and is a distinctive feature of the Chiang Mai skyline. At its peak, the chedi measured 60 metres across at the square base and 80 metres tall and was once the home of the Emerald Buddha, Thailand's most sacred religious relic.

Damaged during an earthquake in 1545, the chedi’s height is reduced to nearly half of its original size yet it is still an impressive structure. In 1992, the Fine Arts Department finished restoration work around the chedi, bringing back the naga (water Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00 - 17:00
  • Location: Phrapokklao Road
  • Tel: +66 (0) 53 24 8604
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This is the oldest temple in the Chiang Mai, built in 1296 at the time of the city's founding. The temple served as the residence of Chiang Mai's founder, King Mengrai, for a time. The buildings are finely decorated in red lacquer, gold leaf and mosaics of tinted mirror, wonderful examples of Lanna style architecture. Wat Chiang Man is located on Ratchaphakhinai Road, near the Chang Puak gate in the northern part of the old city. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 08:00 - 17:00
  • Location: The corner of Ratchaphakhinai Road and Phra Poklao Road soi 13
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Wat Jet Yod (Chet Yot)

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On the superhighway north of the city you will find the unusual Wat Jet Yod, built in the 15th century to host the 8th World Buddhist Council. The name of the temple translates to temple of the seven spires, a reference to the very uncommon design of the temple's chedi.

Instead of the normal design, Wat Jet Yod's chedi has a square base topped by seven towers. The design is based on the Mahabodhi Temple at Bodhgaya, India, site of the Buddha's enlightenment. Today this temple doesn't see too many visitors but does feature some intriguing bas-reliefs.

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Another visually striking temple in Chiang Mai is Wat Lok Moli, well-known for its three-tiered wooden roof and prime location very close to Chang Puak Gate on the north edge of the Old City. The main temple hall has been well-restored, although the weathered chedi at the back shows the temple's true age, dating back to around the 14th century. Although Wat Lok Molee is located very central, it’s just hidden out of the way meaning most tourists miss it, allowing it to enjoy a little more peace and tranquillity compared to some of the city’s other temples. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00 - 17:00
  • Location: Thanon Manee Nopparat Soi 2, Chiang Mai
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Directly adjacent to Wat Chedi Luang, although there is a wall between the two you can walk through one to get to the other. The name of this temple means 'one thousand times more'. Legend has it that this temple used to be the production base for numerous Buddha images that are now housed inside Wat Chedi Luang. The temple has a viharn, which is one of the few remaining all wood structures in Chaing Mai, this was originally the ho kham which literally translates as ‘guilded hall’ and was the palace of Chiang Mai's king, Chao Mahawong, who ruled from 1846 to 1854.It now functions as a monastery. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 07:00-17:00
  • Location: Diagonally adjacent to Wat Chedi Luang, Phrapokklao Road
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Wat Phra Singh is perhaps the second most venerated temple in Chiang Mai after Wat Phra That Doi Suthep. It houses three main structures, the main attraction being the elegantly decorated Lai Kam assembly hall and its restored murals depicting the lives of locals hundreds of years ago.

Located inside the old city wall, at the western end of Ratchadamnoen Road, the temple’s signature Lanna-style roofs and glittering viharn (assembly hall) invite visitors. The walled-in temple compound is busy with visitors and worshippers all year round and is usually packed during the Thai New Year festival (Songkran) in mid-April. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00-17:00
  • Location: Inside the old city wall, at the westernmost end of Ratchadamnoen Road
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Famous (mostly among locals) for its huge seated Buddha, Wat Phra That Doi Kham is one of the lesser-known temples in Chiang Mai thanks to its slightly out-of-the-way location, but nonetheless just as spectacular as many of the more popular temples in Chiang Mai. The Giant Buddha structure towers nearly 20 metres into the air, painted in bright white and gold colours. The whole temple complex dates back more than 1,000 years, with plenty of shrines, pagodas and relics to explore in the tropical garden area in the foothills of the Doi Suthep Mountain range. It is also known as the ‘Temple of the Golden Mountain’. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00 - 18:00
  • Location: Mae Hia, Chiang Mai
  • Tel: +66 (0) 8 4373 4440
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Wat Saen Fang

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This old Burmese style temple is testament to the one time Burmese occupation of Chiang Mai, with its origins going back to the 14th century.

  • Opening Hours: 06:00-17:00
  • Location: Thapae Road
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Founded in 1502, very little remains of the original structures except for the old boundary markers. Instead, they have been replaced with a beautiful silver ordination hall, which is entirely covered (both inside and out) with engraved and embossed silver, nickel and aluminum panels and plated tiles. The murals inside display a combination of elements from Taoism, Zen, and Theravada Buddhism. There is also a silver-working school housed here, which helps to pass on the traditions which led to the temples creation. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00 - 21:00
  • Address: 100 Wulai Road (next to the Wualai Saturday Walking Street Market)
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 Wat Suan Dok, built in late 14th century, houses several structures of historical significance. Among them include the principal pagoda that enshrines the Buddha’s relics, a garden of whitewashed mausoleums housing the ashes of late Chiang Mai rulers and a large open-air wiharn (assembly hall).

The temple is found outside the old city wall, about 1km east of Suan Dok Gate on Suthep Road. Built by a King of Chiang Mai on the grounds of his pleasure garden, this temple was originally intended to serve as a retreat for a revered monk from Sukothai. Read More...

  • Location: Suthep Road, about 1km east of Suan Dok Gate
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Off the beaten track and more than a little odd is Wat U-Mong, which is located about 1 km south of Suthep Road, west of the canal. The halls of this temple are actually tunnels which crisscross an artificial mound.

The tales say that this temple was built for a highly revered monk who was so in touch with the Buddha that he was a little out of touch with everything else and had a habit of wandering off. The temple grounds are heavily forested, owing partially to the temple's long period of abandonment. Between the maze of tunnels and the overgrown jungle you may find yourself wishing you had Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 06:00 - 17:00
  • Address: 135 Moo 10 Suthep, Chiang Mai
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Located in attractive countryside about five kilometres south of Chiang Mai along the Ping River, Wiang Kum Kam is an ancient city dating back to the eighth-century Haripunchai Kingdom. Later on it served as the capital of the then Lanna Kingdom for a short while until Chiang Mai was chosen to replace it in 1296.

Expect to see many interesting items and structures such as stone tablets with Mon inscriptions, Buddhist sculptures and architecture, earthenware and pottery. Taking a horse-drawn carriage is a popular way to enjoy the ruins although some visitors prefer to take their time to appreciate this large site on foot or by rented bicycle. Read More...

  • Opening Hours: 08:00 – 17:00
  • Location: About five km southeast of the Old City (take Route 106, or Chiang Mai – Lamphun Highway, from Chiang Mai City)
  • Tel: +66 (0)53 277 322
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